Snyder releases state budget proposal

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder  (file photo)
Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder (file photo)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULGSVvIpPic

LANSING, Mich. (WOOD) — Gov. Rick Snyder is rolling out his budget priorities for the coming year, and says he wants to spend more on the young, the old, and the environment.

Wednesday morning, Snyder released documents on what he thinks should be done with more than $52 billion the state will have to spend.

According to Snyder, 75 percent of the $52 billion should be dedicated to education and health and human services.

Michigan’s share of revenues will be $10 billion in the general fund and $11.9 billion in the School Aid Fund for fiscal year 2015, for a combined total of $21.9 billion.

The other $30 billion will come mostly from federal dollars.

Gov. Snyder's executive budget recommendation for Fiscal Year 2015. (Source: Gov. Snyder's Office)

Gov. Snyder’s executive budget recommendation for Fiscal Year 2015. (Source: Gov. Snyder’s Office)

On the education front, Snyder has proposed the K-12 budget provides a total of $150 million to increase the annual foundation allowance by $83 to $111 per student.

He also wants another $65 million for early childhood development programs and $3.7 million to improve the quality of child day care.

He also says more money should be spent on senior services, for things like home-delivered meals and services for those with disabilities.

Snyder is also following through with his call to attack invasive species in the state – a promise he made in his State of the State address in January. He wants $6 million in new funding to address the issue.

When it comes to revenue sharing payments for cities, villages, and townships, the payments would increase by $19 million for a total of $764 million.

The governor also puts more than $250 million into roads, which is far short of the more than $1 billion he had asked the legislature for.

Democrats blasted the plan even before it was released.

“The hard-working men and women of Michigan deserve a budget that reflects their priorities, not the priorities of big corporations and the politicians they fund,” said Michigan House of Representatives Democratic Leader Tim Greimel.

As for getting a budget passed –- Republicans still think they can do it by the first of June.

 

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Overview of Fiscal Year 2015 budget proposal

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