Senators express doubts to Barra about new GM

WASHINGTON (AP) — General Motors CEO Mary Barra is back before Congress, where members of a Senate subcommittee are expressing doubts that the culture at the nation’s No. 1 automaker has really changed.

General Motors CEO Mary Barra pauses as she testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 1, 2014, before the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on Oversight and Investigation. The committee is looking for answers from Barra about safety defects and mishandled recall of 2.6 million small cars with a faulty ignition switch that's been linked to 13 deaths and dozen of crashes. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
(GM CEO Mary Barra)

On Tuesday, Barra tried to convey to a House committee that GM is now more focused on safety, saying mistakes made in the past wouldn’t happen at “today’s GM.”

But Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., on Wednesday said the new GM, which emerged from bankruptcy in 2009, had ample time to recall cars equipped with a faulty ignition switch that is linked to at least 13 deaths. GM began recalling the cars this February.

“Even under the new GM banner, the company waited nine months to take action after being confronted with this egregious violation of public trust” McCaskill said.

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