Gov. signs snow day exception law

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) — As  a part of a supplemental school state aid bill Gov. Rick Snyder signed, some school districts will get leeway on the number of snow days they will have to make up for this school year.

Under the bill, districts will be allowed to hold only 174 days of class this school year as long as they provide 1,098 hours of instruction.

So even if the district exceeded its allotted six now days, students may not have to make up time at the end of the year for the district to get its full state aid.

But that applies only to districts that had already planned more than 174 days of school — and not every district did.

Since Greenville Public Schools, according to its website, planned for 173 days, and had to cancel school 17 times this year, its new last day of school is June 19.

Grandville Public Schools planned for 175 days. According to a letter written to parents on the district website, a planned make up day in May was cancelled, after this law went into effect.

Ron Caniff, the district’s superintendent, explained to parents, “Grandville has 175 days of instruction and also exceeds the number of hours of instruction (1,098), even with the cancelations we experienced this winter. In essence, the legislation recognizes school districts like Grandville that exceed state requirements and have extra hours and days built into the school calendar.”

The law also says that if days must be tacked on to the end of this semester, only 60% of students must show up for it to count as a full day of school. That percentage is typically 75%.

If your child’s district hasn’t contact you about the end of the year, you should contact administration to find out what the law means for you.

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Online:

Read the supplemental school aid law

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