Mich. unemployment rate up 0.7 points in July

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LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan authorities say the state’s unemployment rate rose 0.7 percentage points in the latest month, calling it a reflection of normal seasonal changes in the job market.

The state Department of Technology, Management & Budget said Thursday that the state’s seasonally unadjusted joblessness rate reached 8.6 percent in July, up from 7.9 percent in June. It was 9.9 percent in July 2013.

The department says July’s unemployment rates ranged from a low of 6.3 percent in the Ann Arbor region to a high of 9.8 percent in populous metropolitan Detroit.

The Detroit-area rate is up from 9.2 percent in June but down from 10.6 percent in July 2013.

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Michigan’s major labor market areas, their seasonally unadjusted jobless rates for July, followed by June:

— Michigan, 8.6 percent, compared with 7.9 percent.

— Ann Arbor, 6.3 percent, compared with 5.7 percent.

— Battle Creek, 7.4 percent, compared with 6.7 percent.

— Bay City, 8.3 percent, compared with 7.9 percent.

— Detroit-Warren-Livonia, 9.8 percent, compared with 9.2 percent.

— Flint, 9.3 percent, compared with 8.3 percent.

— Grand Rapids-Wyoming, 6.4 percent, compared with 5.7 percent.

— Holland-Grand Haven, 6.4 percent, compared with 5.8 percent.

— Jackson, 8.3 percent, compared with 7.7 percent.

— Kalamazoo-Portage, 7.1 percent, compared with 6.7 percent.

— Lansing-East Lansing, 7.6 percent, compared with 6.5 percent.

— Monroe, 8.1 percent, compared with 6.8 percent.

— Muskegon-Norton Shores, 8.2 percent, compared with 7.4 percent.

— Niles-Benton Harbor, 7.9 percent, compared with 7.4 percent.

— Saginaw-Saginaw Township North, 8.7 percent, compared with 8.1 percent.

— Upper Peninsula, 8.5 percent, compared with 8.3 percent.

— Northeast Lower Michigan, 9.4 percent, compared with 9 percent.

— Northwest Lower Michigan, 7.8 percent, compared with 7.6 percent.

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Source: Michigan Department of Technology, Management & Budget.

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