Justin Timberlake’s ballot selfie highlights mixed laws

Justin Timberlake appears at an event for the new film "Trolls" at Macy's Herald Square on Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, in New York. (Photo Greg Allen/Invision/AP)
Justin Timberlake appears at an event for the new film "Trolls" at Macy's Herald Square on Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, in New York. (Photo Greg Allen/Invision/AP)

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Now even Justin Timberlake has been forced to deal with the question of whether a ballot selfie is legal.

Timberlake flew from California to Tennessee to vote early this week, but his posting of an image of himself at the voting booth on Instagram on Monday drew questions about whether he was breaking the law.

A Tennessee law that took effect earlier this year bars voters from taking photographs or video while they’re inside a polling location.

While secrecy in the voting booth has become a thing of the past for those ready to share their views and daily lives on social media, laws nationwide are mixed on whether voters are allowed to take pictures of themselves voting and their ballots.

Federal courts have struck down bans in New Hampshire and Indiana, and on Monday, a judge in Michigan blocked enforcement of a ban on ballot selfies, saying it violates free speech.

Tennessee Secretary of State spokesman Adam Ghassemi said officials are “thrilled Justin can’t stop the feeling” but reminded voters to use their phones inside polling locations only to help them vote.

Timberlake lives in California, but grew up in the Memphis area and owns property near Nashville.