Pipeline protesters demonstrate through Facebook check-ins

A Dakota Access pipeline protester defies law enforcement officers who are trying to force them from a camp on private land in the path of pipeline construction, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016 near Cannon Ball, N.D.(AP Photo/James MacPherson)
A Dakota Access pipeline protester defies law enforcement officers who are trying to force them from a camp on private land in the path of pipeline construction, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016 near Cannon Ball, N.D.(AP Photo/James MacPherson)

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — A flurry of Facebook check-ins to the Standing Rock Indian Reservation at the epicenter of a protest against the Dakota Access pipeline is at least partially a response to a posting that law enforcement is tracking protesters.

Most people, however, probably aren’t actually making the trip to remote North Dakota.

The check-ins appear to be in reaction to a Facebook post that claims law enforcement is using the social media giant to track protesters.

The post urges people who support the protest to check into the site to confuse authorities.

The Morton County Sheriff’s Department fired back with a post of its own Monday, calling the claim “absolutely false.”

The main camp supporting the protest says the check-ins brought welcome publicity, but also urged supporters to take “physical action,” as well.

More than 140 people were arrested at the site over the weekend.