Local lawmakers discuss Trump policies

U.S. Capitol
The U.S Capitol building in Washington, D.C. on Jan. 18, 2017.


GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) — Members of the U.S. House of Representatives are back in their districts this week while Congress is in recess.

Political Reporter Rick Albin spoke to lawmakers to see where they stand on a number of important issues like the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Republicans in Congress have voted dozens of times to do away with some or all of the plan and likely will again but it’s the replacement part that may prove tricky.

Third District Rep. Justin Amash, R-Grand Rapids, is for repeal.

“I think that replacement should be done by the states,”Amash said.

While southwest Michigan Rep. Fred Upton, R-St. Joseph, is not ready to vote to scrap the current plan until he knows what’s next.

“For me, I have said I do not want, do not intend, will not vote to repeal without knowing what that replacement piece is going to look like,” Upton told 24 Hour News 8.

On a recent episode of “To The Point,” Rep. Bill Huizenga, R-Zeeland, seemed to agree there has to be a replacement.

“To really repair our health care system, which is really the key here,” Huizenga said. “Going back to what we had prior to Obamacare is not success.”

Congressmen have spent the week in their respective districts doing things that Congressmen normally do. But they are also dealing with some questions about what they will do when they head back to Washington, including a potential investigation of the newly sworn in President and the question of Russia.

Rep. John Moolenaar, R-Midland, the Congressman from the sprawling 4th District that takes in a big part of the central part of the state including Mecosta, Montcalm and Gratiot counties spoke to 24 Hour News 8 about the Russia issue.

“I think both of our intelligence committees are working on that and I think it needs to be a bipartisan investigation. We need to understand what Russia is doing.”

Amash is on board too as long as it includes the larger question.

“I think both parts should be investigated. You have a lot of Republicans calling for investigation of the leaks and you lot of Democrats calling for an investigation regarding the allegations. I think both parts have to be investigated,” Amash said.

Upton agrees and would not be opposed to a select committee, if warranted, but says first it should go through regular channels.

“I think we should investigate it. I think we need to see where the path leads us. And if I understand it, now the intelligence committees in both the House and Senate have embarked on that.” Upton said. “Let’s see where it takes us and if we need to expand that I’m not afraid but I want to listen to them first who have really got the first crack at the apple.”

Congress will return to Washington next week to face these and many more questions in what will no doubt be a contentious session.