Target 8 tracks down missing $4,000 tax return

Gilmacs Accounting Payroll Taxes
Melvin McGill of Gilmacs Accounting Payroll Taxes gives Marquinetta Stevenson her tax return. (May 16, 2017)


GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) — Nearly three months after the Internal Revenue Service issued a Grand Rapids woman’s tax return, she still hadn’t received a check and grew concerned that she was the victim of fraud.

Marquinetta Stevenson filed her taxes through Gilmacs Accounting Payroll Taxes, a Grand Rapids business. After contacting the IRS, she discovered that the funds had been deposited into a bank account that wasn’t hers, she said.

She began to contact Gilmacs to no avail.

“I called every single day, several times a day for weeks,” Stevenson told 24 Hour News 8 Tuesday morning. “Right now, to this day, calling the office, have not gotten an answer.”

Gilmacs is owned by Melvin McGill. He said he has been in the tax return filing business for some 27 years. He told Target 8 that a problem with the submission of Stevenson’s bank account information caused the IRS to issue the refund in such a way that he would have to give her a paper check.

But he had not printed the check to give to Stevenson. He blamed a forced and sudden office move for the lag and was apologetic. He printed a check and allowed Target 8 to travel with him as he hand-delivered Stevenson’s money.

McGill’s office was in disarray during Target 8’s Tuesday visit and the phone rang at least twice. In one case, a frustrated customer could be heard leaving an answering machine message indicating that she had been trying to get in touch with Gilmacs’ staff for a month.

Gilmacs filed some 1,000 tax returns this year, McGill said. He charges customers $180 to file their federal, state and city taxes. He said he takes pride in his reputation.

Gilmacs is not accredited with the Better Business Bureau, but no complaints about the business were listed on the BBB website.

McGill insists that Stevenson’s problem was an isolated incident.

“Twenty-seven years,” McGill told Target 8. “First time an error was made.”