GR man shares video of kids letting dog out to teach lesson

A screenshot of surveillance video showing two kids intentionally letting a dog out of a fenced area in Grand Rapids. (Chris Boden/YouTube)


GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) — Two kids intentionally let a dog out of a fenced in area near a busy Grand Rapids roadway.

While the dog is OK, her owner has taken to social media to capture the kids who opened the gate and teach them a lesson.

It was just before about 8:30 a.m. Wednesday when the gang at the Geek Group noticed Mackie, their dog, was out of her pen — and not by accident.

Surveillance video captured the culprits opening the gate and letting Mackie out.

“There’s six different security cameras that they walked past just going around the corner here,” Mackie’s owner and Geek Group CEO Chris Boden said. “This is a big deal to us because you’re letting the dog out at 8:30 in the morning and Leonard Street is 50 feet that way. And I like that dog.”

It all worked out for Mackie. They were able to get her back before she wandered into traffic on busy Leonard Street.

End of story? Not quite.

Boden didn’t just want to let it go.

“The way to handle the other side of the situation is to teach that actions have consequences,” Boden said. “They’re not afraid of the cops. What are the cops going to do? You let a dog out. I want to talk to their parents.”

So Boden posted the video online, hoping to identify the kids.

“I want to talk to these kids. I want to talk to their parents. I want to put them to work for a few hours,” Boden said. “Years ago, if I did something like this, they would had known in 10 seconds because I grew up in a town where everybody knows everybody and your parents would have got a call before you got home from school.”

Boden knows a thing or two about teaching kids lessons. His nonprofit education center allows students to play and experiment with all kinds of gadgets by allowing them to figure out how things works by taking stuff apart, putting it back together, building something else or just experimenting.

Boden’s reason for posting the video and hoping to identify the kids is simple: Kids have to learn actions have consequences and a few hours of work around the school might drive that point home.

The next day, Boden’s post was getting mixed reviews.

“Half of the world is on me over it, ‘You can’t do anything! You might damage the wee precious children,'” Boden shouted for emphasis. “And I’ve got the other half of the people who are like, ‘Kill ’em! Kill ’em! String ’em up!’ I’m like, no, there’s a balance to this.”