Michigan sets PFAS standard for water testing

PFOS, Belmont
An old Wolverine Worldwide dump in Belmont is believed to have contaminated well water with a chemical called PFOS.

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan environmental regulators have adopted a state standard for emerging chemical contaminants that are being found in drinking water, a move they say will let them take regulatory enforcement actions against responsible parties.

The combined criteria for perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctanesfulfonic acid is 70 parts per trillion. That mirrors a federal advisory level set in 2016.

>>Inside woodtv.com: Complete coverage of the toxic tap water investigation

Department of Environmental Quality Director Heidi Grether said Tuesday having a state standard enables the state to issue violation notices and take legal action against parties who do not comply with cleaning up contaminated sites.

The chemicals were long used in firefighting, waterproofing, carpeting and other products. They have been identified at 28 sites in 14 Michigan communities, including near where footwear company Wolverine Worldwide dumped waste decades ago north of Grand Rapids.